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Re: WASP LHD-1, The Build

Posted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 2:40 pm
by Pete Coleman
Wow Phil! She turned out looking just great. All your hard work and tenacity with the etch-work has paid off handsomely. x30x x26x
You must be well pleased with your handiwork.
Cheers,
Pete.

PS Just let me know when you want to start the new build log!

Re: WASP LHD-1, The Build

Posted: Tue Dec 20, 2011 8:22 pm
by Rob
Well done indeed Phil you must be really pleased with how she turned out, especially after your trepidation about using etch!

Seasons greetings to you Phil and good luck with the shoulder. x26x

Rob.

Re: WASP LHD-1, The Build

Posted: Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:49 am
by Force9
Hello Phil...

The jaw drops when viewing your incredible Wasp... You've become a PE master to be sure and your weathering looks to be the right balance - sometimes that gets overdone all too often.

The USS United States will be a challenge - certainly a more understated railing will be in order. I'm admittedly not a fan of that kit - at least how the ship is represented. My suspicion is that the Revell folks at the time utilized the very suspect Currier & Ives print as their guide - this was based on the terrific Thomas Birch painting of her battle with Macedonian, but I think they used a more modern version of the United States (circa 1840's?) that seems wholly out of whack from what Humphreys originally designed. I'd suggest using the original Birch painting as a guide. You might try using the poop deck layout of one of Humphrey's Ship-Of-The-Line designs as a guide to what he would've done when adding the roundhouse to United States. Those designs are included in the Howard I. Chappelle book on the early US Navy. Chappelle uses dotted lines on his representation of the 44 design to indicate the USS United States differences... He indicates in the side notes that the quarter galleries were probably stacked and mentions a painting of Commodore Barry with the ship in the background as his guide (as well as some of the Commodore's journal entries).

The Birch painting was apparently based on eyewitness accounts and the artist may, in fact, have sketched the actual ship. The quarter galleries are not stacked and there is not a second tier of stern gallery windows. This would seem to me to line up with the spare Yankee/Quaker sensibilities of the designer - especially considering the struggles in congress at the time to fund the completion of these very expensive ships. I suspect the roundhouse was done with minimal embellishment and expense and looked like what Birch depicted - not what we see in the kit. We'll of course never know for certain - as you say - the plans went up in flames when Cochrane and his cronies indecorously torched our capital city.

Good luck!